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ACTION ALERT: TELL THE EPA TO ACT NOW ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Learn how to submit public comment down below. 

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What’s Happening? 

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is holding public comment regarding its new Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). This new rule requires coal plants to install Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) controls, find other compliance means or retire by 2027.

Why should you care?

Scientists and leaders worldwide have stressed that we need to reduce emissions by 2030 to prevent the worst effects of climate change. Past efforts in 2016 to require SCR technology have failed and we need the EPA to act now. 

Whether these plants ultimately retire or finally install SCR technology, this approach will help clean the air in Southern Utah and address climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

What can you do?

We need your help by providing public comment to the EPA, pressuring them to require power plants with SCRs to start using them at the beginning of the 2023 ozone season and those without SCRs to install them by the 2024 ozone season. 

How To Submit? 

  1. Go to the Federal Register website and select the “Submit a Formal Comment!” button.
  2. On the new page, enter your comment. Note: It’s best to type your comment beforehand and copy and paste.
  3. Comments must be submitted by 11:59 PM EDT, June 6, 2022.

Check out the Sierra Clubs tips on how to submit a public comment here: EPA Virtual Hearing on the Good Neighbor Ozone Rule: How-To Guide on Preparing Testimony or Comment

Ozone Health Effects:

  • Increases in asthma attacks, respiratory issues, and heart problems are all linked to ozone exposure. Ozone is commonly referred to as a “sunburn for the lungs” 
  • With CSAPR expansion, the EPA projects that there would be 1.3 million less asthma cases, 1,000 less premature deaths, 2,00 less hospital visits, 470,000 less school absences annually in the US.(source)
  • 8,000 stillbirths a year in the US can be attributed to chronic ozone exposure. (source)
  • 137 million people in the US live in an ozone nonattainment area, which amounts to over 40% of the US population. (source)